Last edited by Feran
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

5 edition of Prenatal cocaine exposure found in the catalog.

Prenatal cocaine exposure

  • 290 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by CRC Press in Boca Raton .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cocaine -- Toxicology.,
  • Fetus -- Effect of drugs on.,
  • Children of prenatal substance abuse.,
  • Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects.,
  • Cocaine -- adverse effects.,
  • Substance effects -- in pregnancy.,
  • Fetus -- drug effects.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Richard J. Konkol, George D. Olsen.
    ContributionsKonkol, Richard J., Olsen, George D.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRG627.6.N37 P74 1996
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 192 p. :
    Number of Pages192
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL811444M
    ISBN 100849394651
    LC Control Number95048362

    Prenatal development (from Latin natalis, meaning 'relating to birth') includes the development of the embryo and of the fetus during a viviparous animal's al development starts with fertilization, in the germinal stage of embryonic development, and continues in fetal development until birth.. In human pregnancy, prenatal development is also called antenatal development. Prenatal Drug Exposure and Disruption of Attachment These thoughts came to mind as I read a recently published book, The profound impact of the child's prenatal alcohol and drug exposure.

    Cocaine-Exposed Infants examines what is known about the problem and unravels some of the contradictions in the extant literature. The authors also explore in-depth the media frenzy over so-called crack babies and the resulting legislation that served to criminalize drug use during pregnancy. To determine if cocaine alters other aspects of the oxytocin system, oxytocin mRNA transcription and receptor binding were examined on postpartum day two in relevant brain regions following gestational treatment with, or prenatal exposure to, either cocaine or : Matthew S. McMurray.

    Prenatal drug exposure is a major public health concern for mothers and their children. In addition, society bears significant financial costs associated with social and child welfare services utilization [3, 4], neonatal intensive care unit costs, and longer hospital stays after delivery [3–8].Children with prenatal drug exposure are also more likely to need intervention services to address Author: Jennifer Willford, Conner Smith, Tyler Kuhn, Brady Weber, Gale Richardson. Drug Exposure. Drug exposure to a developing fetus has been associated with potential side effects and even long-term issues for the child. It is often difficult, however, to estimate the long-term consequences to a child, as much depends on the extent of prenatal care, nutrition, and quality of early parenting and whether it involves neglect or abuse.


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Prenatal cocaine exposure Download PDF EPUB FB2

Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Medicine & Health Science Books @ Skip to main content. Try Prime EN Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Cart. Books. Go Search Best Sellers Gift Ideas New Releases Whole Foods Today's Cited by: 4.

Such problems have broad implications for education, social welfare, and criminal justice in the U.S. However, there are numerous opportunities to minimize prenatal cocaine exposure and its Prenatal cocaine exposure book and thus to enhance the wellbeing of women and their by: 7.

Prenatal Cocaine Exposures addresses the timely problem of maternal cocaine abuse and its effects on exposed infants, including growth retardation, learning, cardiovascular effects, and seizures. The impact of substance abuse on this and future generations presents an ongoing challenge to medical science.

Reginald P. Sequeira, in Side Effects of Drugs Annual, Fetotoxicity. Prenatal exposure to cocaine can alter the typical developmental trajectory of functional asymmetries. Twenty infants who were prenatally exposed to cocaine performed a grasping task with their right hand for significantly shorter durations and were less likely to show a dominant hand preference at 1 month of age (39 c).

Children With Prenatal Drug Exposure examines new medical approaches for predicting the developmental progress of children who have been exposed to drugs in utero. This book outlines effective methods for intervention and assessment and indicates future directions for investigation.

It provides practical and up-to-date information on treatments and research development, while it. Read the full-text online edition of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Scientific Considerations and Policy Implications (). Home» Browse» Books» Book details, Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Scientific.

Prenatal Cocaine Exposure - CRC Press Book. Prenatal Cocaine Exposures addresses the timely problem of maternal cocaine abuse and its effects on exposed infants, including growth retardation, learning, cardiovascular effects, and seizures. The impact of substance abuse on this and future generations presents an ongoing challenge to medical sc.

Get this from a library. Prenatal cocaine exposure. [Richard J Konkol; George D Olsen;] -- Prenatal Cocaine Exposure addresses the timely problem of maternal cocaine abuse and its effects on exposed infants, including growth retardation, learning, cardiovascular effects, and seizures.

The. Eileen Wong, Sarah Guzofski, in Side Effects of Drugs Annual, Behavior. Prenatal exposure to cocaine is associated with behavioral problems in children of school age. The degree to which sex-specific effects can be identified in relation to prenatal cocaine exposure was the focus of two studies by the same group of researchers.

In the first study subjects, who had been. for reporting prenatal substance exposure, and (3) involvement of physicians in designing and implementing the protocols.

TERTIARY PREVENTION Although research has shown that in utero cocaine exposure leads to subtle neurological changes and is associated with learning and be-havioral problems that manifest in childhood, cocaine exposure does.

Prenatal exposure to amphetamines has lasting subtle effects on neonatal brain structure and function. Some studies have shown decreased volume of the caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus (anatomic components of brain) in methamphetamine-exposed children, whereas other studies have not uniformly confirmed these studies indicate that prenatal methamphetamine exposure may be.

The decision to adopt should be made with thought and care after considerable reflection, discussion, and gathering of information. The decision to adopt a child with prenatal drug exposure involves added challenges. Designed primarily for professionals, this book offers practical suggestions, recommendations, and food for thought for preparing, counseling, and working with prospective.

Children With Prenatal Drug Exposure examines new medical approaches for predicting the developmental progress of children who have been exposed to drugs in utero.

This book outlines effective methods for intervention and assessment and indicates future directions for investigation. It Price: $ This chapter discusses the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on three adolescent behavioral outcomes: internalizing and externalizing behavior, substance use, and sexual risk behavior.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Children with prenatal drug exposure. New York: Haworth Press,© (OCoLC) Document Type. Prenatal Exposure to Alcohol or Drugs Adoptive parents are sometimes faced with the decision of whether to adopt a child that has been exposed during pregnancy to alcohol, methamphetamines, marijuana, heroin, crack, oxycodone, prescription drugs, or other drugs.

The impact of prenatal cocaine exposure in animals on the dopamine (DA) systems of the offspring has been studies by several group (Keller and Snyder-Keller, ; Harvey, ), including our own.

During this time, a human's immune system reaches its full potential. A long childhood period is a "left over" adaptation from the time when the human life span was considerably shorter than it is today. Rebellion against authority is a necessary step in the evolutionary development of independent behavior.

During this time, humans. Prenatal drug exposure has been frequently associated with behavioral dysregulation in the neonatal period 14 – 16 as well as with problems in attention and impulse control in school-aged children up to age 10 years.

1, 17 – 19 Cocaine readily crosses the placenta, with the potential to directly affect the developing fetus. 20 It has been Cited by:   Longitudinal studies suggest that prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) affects the developing child’s capacity for sustained attention, working memory, inhibitory control, stress responses and emotion regulation (1–4).Among possible outcomes for PCE children is substance use initiation as adolescents, and PCE has been reported to predict cocaine use at age 14 ().Cited by:.

Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Age 7 Behavior: The Roles of Gender, Quantity, and Duration of Exposure Virginia Delaney-Black, Chandice Covington, Lisa M. Chiodo, John H. Hannigan, Mark K.

Greenwald, James Janisse, Grace Patterson, Joel Ager, Ekemini Akan, Linda Lewandowski, Steven J. Ondersma, Ty Partridge and Robert J. SokolPages: BABY STEPS: CARING FOR BABIES WITH PRENATAL SUBSTANCE EXPOSURE ii USING THIS MANUAL This caregiver guide is intended to be a hands-on resource for parents and caregivers of babies who have been prenatally exposed to alcohol and other File Size: 1MB.Adverse effects of prenatal exposure to neurotoxins, including cocaine, alcohol, marijuana, and lead, are well documented and range from initial growth deficits to later cognitive and behavioral problems.

Exciting new research has found that there are gender differences in these sequelae resulting in different outcomes for males and females.

Namely, exposed males appear to be more vulnerable Cited by: 8.